My Blog
By Wester Dental Care, P.C.
July 20, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
DentalTreatmentDependsonWhatsReallyCausingYourToothPain

Not all toothaches are alike: Some are sharp and last only a second or two; others throb continuously. You might feel the pain in one tooth, or it could be more generalized.

Because there are as many causes as there are kinds of dental pain, you can expect a few questions on specifics when you come to us with a toothache. Understanding first what kind of pain you have will help us more accurately diagnose the cause and determine the type of treatment you need.

Here are a few examples of dental pain and what could be causing it.

Temperature sensitivity. People sometimes experience a sudden jolt of pain when they eat or drink something cold or hot. If it only lasts for a moment or two, this could mean you have a small area of tooth decay, a loose filling, or an exposed root surface due to gum recession. If the pain lingers, though, you may have internal decay or the nerve tissue within the tooth has died. If so, you may require a root canal treatment.

Sharp pain when chewing. Problems like decay, a loose filling or a cracked tooth could cause pain when you bite down. We may be able to solve the problem with a filling (or repair an older one), or you may need more extensive treatment like a root canal. In any event, if you notice this as a recurring problem, don't wait on seeing us—the condition could worsen.

Dull pain near the jaw and sinuses. Because both the jaws and sinuses share the same nerve network, it's often hard to tell where the pain or pressure originates—it could be either. You may first want to see us or an endodontist to rule out tooth decay or another dental problem. If your teeth are healthy, your next step may be a visit with a physician to examine your sinuses.

As you can see, tooth pain can be a sign of a number of problems, both big and small. That's why it's important to see us as soon as possible for an examination and diagnosis. The sooner we can treat whatever is causing the pain, the sooner your discomfort will end.

If you would like more information on treating dental pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!

By Wester Dental Care, P.C.
July 10, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers  
YourNewPorcelainVeneersCanLastandLookGreataLongTime

Dental veneers are a popular way to improve teeth with chips, stains, gaps or other defects. They're typically made of dental porcelain, ceramic-like materials prized for their ability to mimic the texture, color and translucency of natural teeth.

But dental porcelain doesn't come in one form—a dentist can utilize variations of it to better match a patient's need. For example, one patient may need a porcelain with added strength, while another may need one that provides better coverage of underlying discoloration.

The foundational materials for veneer porcelain are glass ceramics. Also used for crowns, glass ceramics have been the preferred choice of dentists for some time to achieve life-like results. In terms of veneers, dental technicians first mix the powdered form of the porcelain with water to create a paste. They then use the paste to build up the body of a veneer layer by layer.

But while the high degree of silica (glass) in this type of porcelain best resembles the translucence of natural teeth, early forms of it lacked strength. This changed in the 1990s when technicians began adding a material called leucite to the ceramic mixture that enhanced its strength and durability.

Today, you'll also find lithium disilicate used, which is twice as strong as leucite and is quite useful when creating thinner veneers. Both of these strength materials can be pressed and milled into shape, which helps achieve a more accurate fit. Along with the underlying glass ceramic, the result is a veneer that's both durable and incredibly life-like.

Although today's porcelain veneers are far superior in durability than earlier forms, they can be damaged when biting down on hard objects. To make sure your veneers last as long as possible, you should avoid biting down directly on hard-skinned fruit, or using your veneered teeth to crack nuts or crunch ice (or any other teeth, for that matter).

But with proper care, today's veneers have exceptional longevity. And, thanks to the superior dental materials that compose them, they'll look great for years.

If you would like more information on dental veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers: Your Smile—Better Than Ever.”

WhetherVotingforaCandidateorWisdomTeethYouCanChooseWisely

During election season, you'll often hear celebrities encouraging you to vote. But this year, Kaia Gerber, an up-and-coming model following the career path of her mother Cindy Crawford, made a unique election appeal—while getting her wisdom teeth removed.

With ice packs secured to her jaw, Gerber posted a selfie to social media right after her surgery. The caption read, “We don't need wisdom teeth to vote wisely.”

That's great advice—electing our leaders is one of the most important choices we make as a society. But Gerber's post also highlights another decision that bears careful consideration, whether or not to have your wisdom teeth removed.

Found in the very back of the mouth, wisdom teeth (or “third molars”) are usually the last of the permanent teeth to erupt between ages 17 and 25. But although their name may be a salute to coming of age, in reality wisdom teeth can be a pain. Because they're usually last to the party, they're often erupting in a jaw already crowded with teeth. Such a situation can be a recipe for numerous dental problems.

Crowded wisdom teeth may not erupt properly and remain totally or partially hidden within the gums (impaction). As such, they can impinge on and damage the roots of neighboring teeth, and can make overall hygiene more difficult, increasing the risk of dental disease. They can also help pressure other teeth out of position, resulting in an abnormal bite.

Because of this potential for problems, it's been a common practice in dentistry to remove wisdom teeth preemptively before any problems arise. As a result, wisdom teeth extractions are the top oral surgical procedure performed, with around 10 million of them removed every year.

But that practice is beginning to wane, as many dentists are now adopting more of a “wait and see” approach. If the wisdom teeth show signs of problems—impaction, tooth decay, gum disease or bite influence—removal is usually recommended. If not, though, the wisdom teeth are closely monitored during adolescence and early adulthood. If no problems develop, they may be left intact.

This approach works best if you maintain regular dental cleanings and checkups. During these visits, we'll be able to consistently evaluate the overall health of your mouth, particularly in relation to your wisdom teeth.

Just as getting information on candidates helps you decide your vote, this approach of watchful waiting can help us recommend the best course for your wisdom teeth. Whether you vote your wisdom teeth “in” or “out,” you'll be able to do it wisely.

If you would like more information about what's best to do about wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.”

By Wester Dental Care, P.C.
June 20, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
DoThisForaHealthierMouthandOverallWell-Being

Health is on everyone's mind, especially after dealing with COVID-19 this past year. Beyond the immediate concerns of coping with this novel coronavirus, many are taking a closer look at improving their overall well-being. If that describes you, then don't forget this very important component of good health—your teeth and gums.

It's easy to see the body as just a collection of individual organs and anatomical structures. But in reality, all these individual parts are intertwined—if one part is unhealthy, it could directly or indirectly impact the health of all the others.

That's especially true in the mouth. There's some evidence that both tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease can increase inflammation throughout the body, and worsen conditions like diabetes. And problems like chronic jaw joint pain or teeth loss could make it more difficult for the body to meet its nutritional needs.

In other words, you need to take just as much care of your teeth and gums as you do the rest of your body. In recognition of Oral Health Month this June, here's how.

Clear away plaque. Dental plaque, a thin bacterial film that accumulates daily on tooth surfaces, is the most common cause of tooth-destroying dental diseases. Removing plaque buildup every day with brushing and flossing is the single best thing you can do personally to maintain optimal oral health.

See your dentist. Even so, the most thorough hygiene regimen can miss a few plaque deposits. These can then harden into tartar (or calculus) that's nearly impossible to remove with brushing or flossing. A regular dental cleaning clears up any lingering plaque and tartar to further lower your disease risk.

Eat a "tooth-friendly" diet. A diet high in carbohydrates (particularly refined sugar) and processed foods can spell trouble for both the body and the mouth. But whole foods rich in micronutrients like calcium, potassium, or vitamin D, strengthens your teeth and gums against tooth decay or gum disease.

Maintain your dental work. Dental work like fillings, crowns, implants or bridges aid dental health and function, not to mention appearance. But they can wear over time, so keep up regular dental visits to assess their condition and make any needed repairs. Be sure you also clean them and the rest of your mouth daily.

A healthy body depends on a healthy mouth. Following these steps for better oral health will go a long way in achieving optimum physical well-being.

If you would like more information about best oral health practices, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

By Wester Dental Care, P.C.
June 16, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  

We all want a smile that we are proud to show off, but if in spite of impeccable hygiene, if you still do not have the bright white smile you know you deserve, then professional teeth whitening may be what you're looking for. Over-the-counter products cannot deliver the same quality of results, so to learn more contact Dr. Keith Wester and Dr. Jennifer Sarantos of Wester Dental Care in Portage, MI.

Why Professional Whitening?

Over-the-counter whitening products can be effective under the right circumstances. But their application can take weeks, sometimes months, and the results can't match what your doctor can accomplish in the office. The procedure takes only about an hour and most can expect a smile many shades whiter. While some products employ the same bleaching agents as your dentist, they use them in a lower concentration because only your doctor can offer a professional and safe setting to do so.

What Causes Stains?

Your bright smile can last you for years but having your teeth professionally whitened does not make them immune to stains. You should avoid colorful foods immediately after the procedure, and then try to not overindulge in them. Good dental hygiene can help maintain your goal, but over time, along with certain foods, coffee, and tea, and tobacco, can alter the appearance of your smile.

The Limitations of Whitening

A healthy smile is usually a good first step toward a brighter, lighter smile, if not a requirement before your dentist can recommend teeth whitening. For some, especially those who have not been to the office in some time, teeth cleaning sessions alone can do wonders. It's important also to remember that whitening treatments are not effective on crowns or veneers, or by stains brought on by either trauma or medication.

Teeth Whitening in Portage, MI

So if you are ready to renew your smile schedule a consultation with Dr. Wester and Dr. Sarantos today. Make an appointment with Wester Dental Care in Portage, MI, by dialing (269) 327-1119.





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